Multi-American | How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: Homeland Security funding, immigrants and the poultry industry, Caribbean immigrants, more



Inside a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Los Angeles, April 2012. The agency is part of the Department of Homeland Security, whose budget is part of an ongoing Congressional battle over President Obama's immigration order. But the agency is mostly funded by user fees, meaning it does not rely on Congressional appropriations.
Inside a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Los Angeles, April 2012. The agency is part of the Department of Homeland Security, whose budget is part of an ongoing Congressional battle over President Obama's immigration order. But the agency is mostly funded by user fees, meaning it does not rely on Congressional appropriations.
Ruxandra Guidi/KPCC

Why a DHS shutdown won’t stop Obama’s immigration orders - Washington Post Among other things, the agency that would carry out Obama's immigration plan does not rely on Congressional funding. From the story: "U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Homeland Security agency responsible for deportations, draws about 95 percent of its annual budget from application fees. That means the agency can largely survive without appropriations." Obama's immigration order remains on hold as the administration appeals a court ruling.

In Solidarity: When Caribbean Immigrants Become Black - NBC News Children of Caribbean immigrants grow up in a different cultural setting than black Americans, but their experiences shape their assimilation. From the piece: "By the second generation many black immigrants find they have become black Americans. The clipped cadences and other linguistic markers that once identified their parents as foreign have faded."

1 billion chickens sold: Alabama's massive chicken industry, immigrants and Obama's plan - AL.com Immigrant advocates in Alabama estimate that President Obama's immigration order could benefit as many as 25,000 immigrants without legal status, many of whom work in the poultry industry. From the story: "Alabama employs 12,680 chicken cutters and trimmers - the largest number those types of workers in America. And there's no reason to believe, given our national appetite for chicken, that they will be leaving anytime soon."

Immigrants View Test Prep as a Ticket to Better Future - Wall Street Journal On how standardized test preparation businesses cater to immigrant families. From the story: "At a time when many parents balk at what they see as too much test preparation and mounting pressure to 'teach to the test,' business is thriving at Asian tutoring centers that supplement regular schoolwork and help children get ready for exams that are gateways to coveted public programs."