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How LA school board hopefuls answered KPCC's survey questions

KPCC submitted a survey to all 13 L.A. Unified School Board candidates. We asked them seven questions on a range of issues. Here's how they responded.
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Recent Education coverage

Why So Many Asian Americans Are Learning Remotely

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Multigenerational households and anti-Asian bullying may play a role.

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Education Dept. Restores Debt Cancellation For Some Borrowers With Disabilities

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Monday's announcement comes after thousands of borrowers with disabilities had their federal student loans erased, then handed back to them during the pandemic.

COVID-19 Lockdowns Have Been Hard On Youth Locked Up

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Juvenile incarceration is down, but many young people still in facilities have gone months without seeing their families.

After A Year Of Remote Classes, Teachers Are Meeting Students For The First Time

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As schools reopen — either fully or for hybrid learning — teachers are getting the chance to meet their students face-to-face.

Biden Says Schools Are On Track To Open As Promised, But Will Kids Go?

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The president appears likely to reopen the majority of K-8 schools within his first 100 days in office, but many families are still opting out.

Rutgers To Require Vaccine Proof For 'All Students Planning To Attend This Fall'

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The New Jersey school says its new COVID-19 requirement will help it make "a full return to our pre-pandemic normal" on campus.

New Data Highlight Disparities In Students Learning In Person

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The first federal survey on school reopening shows racial and geographic differences in participation in full-time, in person learning.

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Homeschooling Doubled During The Pandemic, U.S. Census Survey Finds

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Precise numbers are hard to come by, but several factors — including school closures and parents working from home — appear to have led to an increase in households that are homeschooling.

CDC Says Schools Can Now Space Students 3 Feet Apart, Rather Than 6

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In many places, the 6-foot guidance was interpreted as requiring schools to operate on part-time schedules in order to reduce class sizes. A 3-foot rule would allow many more schools to reopen fully.

Education Dept. Begins Rolling Back Trump-Era Policies On Defrauded Students

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The U.S. Department of Education says it is scrapping a controversial, Trump-era policy that granted only partial student loan relief to borrowers who were defrauded by private, for-profit colleges.

LA Schools, Teachers Reach Tentative Deal To Reopen Classrooms To In-Person Learning

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The agreement, which still must be ratified by members of the teachers union, would see most students returning to physical classrooms for the first time in more than a year.

As Many Parents Fret Over Remote Learning, Some Find Their Kids Are Thriving

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"It's a lot easier to focus," says one sixth grader with ADHD. While some students fell behind while learning virtually during the pandemic, others focus better when they aren't around classmates.

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NPR/Ipsos Poll: Nearly One Third Of Parents May Stick With Remote Learning

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Four out of 5 parents told us they support targeted interventions by schools that would help students recover academic, social and emotional skills.

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California Offers $2 Billion Incentive In A Push For In-Person Learning

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Public schools that don't offer in-person instruction for k-2 students by the end of the month will lose out on 1% of eligible funds every day that students remain out of the classroom.

Lifelong Educator, Miguel Cardona, Confirmed As Education Secretary

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The former fourth grade teacher, principal and state education commissioner will take the reins at the U.S. Department of Education as the fight intensifies over school reopening.

For Some Black Students, Remote Learning Has Offered A Chance To Thrive

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Back when school was in person, eighth-grader Josh Secrett was always tired. Now, away from the bias he sometimes encountered in classrooms, he says, "I'm more energized. I want to do more things."