Health | Covering health care and health policy in Southern California

A 'potentially powerful model' for treating sickle cell

A sickle cell clinic in South L.A. is believed to be the first of its kind: It brings primary and specialty care providers under one roof to treat the disease.
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Recent Health coverage

Separating Kids From Their Parents Can Lead To Long-Term Health Problems

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Though the federal government is changing its policy of separating immigrant children and parents, some children who were detained may suffer ongoing health consequences from the trauma.

Atul Gawande Named CEO Of Health Venture By Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway And JPMorgan

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A surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Gawande is probably best known for his work writing about how to improve quality and lower costs in health care.

A Pediatrician Reports Back From A Visit To A Children's Shelter Near The Border

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Doctors worry that the trauma children experience when they were separated from their parents at the U.S. border could have lasting health effects.

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A Look At Social Media Finds Some Possible Benefits For Kids

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Researchers analyzing data from a study looking at adolescent cognition found greater social media use was associated with increased physical activity and less family conflict.

Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'

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A committee of experts examined about a dozen different synthetic biology technologies that could be potentially misused. For each, they considered how likely it was to be usable as a weapon.

Opening Up About Depression And Suicide Could Help Someone Else On The Brink

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With suicide in the news, a writer finds the courage to share the story of her own worst night — and what got her through.

Credibility Concerns Lead NIH To End Study Of Alcohol's Health Effects

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Scientists and National Institutes of Health officials met with alcohol company executives and appeared to solicit money from them in violation of government policy. The NIH canceled the study.

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Lawmakers In Illinois Embrace Medical Marijuana As An Opioid Alternative

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Seeking solutions for the opioid crisis, policy makers in Illinois and many other states are looking to expand access to marijuana for chronic pain sufferers.

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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The jury's been out on whether low blood levels of vitamin D increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Researchers say a new review involving more than 12,000 people strongly suggests the answer is yes.

U.S. Suicides Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than Men

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You can help prevent suicide, researchers say, by knowing the signs and reaching out. More boys and men in the U.S. take their own lives than women and girls, but that difference has narrowed.

Errors Trigger Retraction Of Study On Mediterranean Diet's Heart Benefits

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An anesthesiologist who taught himself statistics identified flaws in an influential study that claimed to prove the Mediterranean diet has cardiovascular benefits. The 2013 paper is being retracted.

Medicare Takes Aim At Boomerang Hospitalizations Of Nursing Home Patients

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One in 5 Medicare patients who leaves the hospital for a nursing home ends up back in the hospital. The federal government will soon use bonuses and penalties to try to lower readmissions.

1 in 3 Adults In The U.S. Take Medications That Can Cause Depression

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200 medications have depression as a possible side effect. Now, a new study finds people who take these drugs are, in fact, more likely to be depressed. The more drugs you take, the higher the risk.

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Trump's Redirection Of Family Planning Funds Could Undercut STD Fight

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Some public health officials fear Trump's move to change how the Title X family planning funding is handled may hurt the effort to cut the record number of sexually transmitted diseases in the U.S.

Doctors Told Not To Order Electrocardiograms For Low-Risk Patients

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The U.S Preventive Services Task Force says that the benefits from routine electrocardiograms in people at low risk of heart disease don't outweigh the harms from unnecessary follow-up tests.

A Science Writer Explores The 'Perversions And Potential' Of Genetic Tests

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Carl Zimmer wondered what secrets lurked in his genetic code — so he decided to have his genome sequenced. He writes about the implications of the study of genetics in She Has Her Mother's Laugh.

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