Health | Covering health care and health policy in Southern California

A 'potentially powerful model' for treating sickle cell

A sickle cell clinic in South L.A. is believed to be the first of its kind: It brings primary and specialty care providers under one roof to treat the disease.
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Recent Health coverage

Right to Try Act poses big challenge for FDA

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Legislation that would give terminally ill people a direct path to get experimental treatments raises questions about how the Food and Drug Administration would safeguard patients.

Where you live affects your happiness and health, but how exactly?

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To the researchers' surprise, they discovered that just 12 of 75 factors related to demographics, clinical care, social and economic factors, while the physical environment explained over 90 percent of the variation in well-being across the country.

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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A study of patients with low back pain finds that those who got physical therapy first needed fewer pricey scans and surgeries and had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs" for treatment overall.

California's Message To Hospitals: Shape Up Or Lose 'In-Network' Status

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Covered California, the state's health insurance exchange, will exclude hospitals from insurance networks if they don't reduce their numbers of C-sections, back scans and opioid prescriptions.

Routine DNA Screening Moves Into Primary Care

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The Pennsylvania-based health care chain Geisinger Health System plans to soon offer DNA sequencing as part of routine care for all patients. Is there a downside?

Another cause of doctor burnout? Being forced to give immigrants unequal care

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Undocumented patients with kidney disease often can't get treatment unless they are in a state of emergency — this bothers clinicians who want to treat all patients equally.

Is sleeping with your baby as dangerous as doctors say?

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Many doctors in the U.S. say the practice puts an infant at risk of sleep-related death. A close look at the research reveals a different picture.

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More Health

'Pain is my constant companion'

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KPCC follows one woman for a week to see what it's like to experience near constant pain. Check back for daily updates.

USDA unveils GMO food labels — and they're confusing

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The prototype labels use "BE," for bioengineered, instead of GMO. One design features a smiling sun that a skeptic calls "propaganda for the industry."

What Does Trump's Proposal To Cut Planned Parenthood Funds Mean?

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The Trump administration is pulling out an old regulation that it believes will be able to meet a conservative goal: cutting a key program's funding for Planned Parenthood. The strategy might work.

New Type Of Drug To Prevent Migraines Heads To Market

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An antibody-based drug reduces the frequency of migraine headaches, according to data reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration. The agency approved Aimovig, priced at about $6,900 a year.

Report: Most Former Research Chimps Should Move To Retirement Sanctuaries

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A working group convened by the National Institutes of Health looked at where chimps that had been used in research should live now. Unless relocating chimps would endanger them, a sanctuary is best.

White House To Ban Federal Funds For Clinics That Discuss Abortion With Patients

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The Department of Health and Human Services is expected to announce that it is reviving a Reagan-era rule that bars groups that receive federal funding from discussing abortion with patients.

Army 'Leans In' To Protect A Shooter's Brain From Blast Injury

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The Army tells NPR of plans to monitor blast exposure across a military career, to enforce limits on firing certain weapons, and to even look into whether special helmets could help stop blast waves.

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Grand jury faults response to San Diego's hepatitis outbreak

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A grand jury report following one of the worst outbreaks of Hepatitis A in the United States in 20 years faulted the response of San Diego city and county officials on Thursday and recommended improving communications to prepare for future health emergencies.

How ER docs could help fight the opioid epidemic

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L.A. County-USC Medical Center is piloting a program in which ER doctors steer patients with opioid use disorders into treatment.

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