How has California’s drought impacted you—or not?

EADS, CO - AUGUST 22:  A cow walk on a dried-up pond in a drought-ravaged pasture on August 22, 2012 near Eads, Colorado. The severe drought has dried up most of eastern Colorado's natural grassland, forcing many ranchers to sell off much of their livestock early to feedlots, which fatten up the cattle for slaughter. More than 50 percent of high plains areas of eastern Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas are still in extreme or exceptional drought, despite recent lower temperatures, according to the University of Nebraska's Drought Monitor. The record-breaking drought, which has affected more than half of the continental United States, is expected to drive up food prices by 2013 due to lower crop harvests and the adverse effect on the nation's cattle industry.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
EADS, CO - AUGUST 22: A cow walk on a dried-up pond in a drought-ravaged pasture on August 22, 2012 near Eads, Colorado. The severe drought has dried up most of eastern Colorado's natural grassland, forcing many ranchers to sell off much of their livestock early to feedlots, which fatten up the cattle for slaughter. More than 50 percent of high plains areas of eastern Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas are still in extreme or exceptional drought, despite recent lower temperatures, according to the University of Nebraska's Drought Monitor. The record-breaking drought, which has affected more than half of the continental United States, is expected to drive up food prices by 2013 due to lower crop harvests and the adverse effect on the nation's cattle industry. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore/Getty Images

With no end in sight for a drought now four years old, California Governor Jerry Brown has announced mandatory statewide measures to cut consumption. And city mayors throughout the state are calling on residents to think about water use. 

KPCC, Southern California Public Radio, has partnered with newsrooms across the country to see how everyday people are feeling the effect—or not—of the drought. 

Participating newsrooms include Utah Public Radio, Minnesota Public Radio, the Public Insight Network Bureau, Cronkite News/Arizona PBS, Harvest Public Media, WFYI, and KOSU. 

Everything you share will be read by journalists only, and your responses are confidential unless you tell us we may publish them.