US & World

Roger Mudd remembers Daniel Schorr

Journalist Daniel Schorr talks about his book 'Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism' May 6, 2001 on 'Meet the Press' during a taping at the NBC studios in Washington, DC.
Journalist Daniel Schorr talks about his book 'Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism' May 6, 2001 on 'Meet the Press' during a taping at the NBC studios in Washington, DC.
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Daniel Schorr’s friend and broadcast colleague, Roger Mudd, told KPCC’s Larry Mantle that Schorr's work on the Watergate Scandal was the pride of the CBS Washington bureau.

NPR’s senior news analyst, veteran journalist Daniel Schorr, died today at age 93. His reporting during Watergate and the Cold War won many awards, including thee Emmys.

Mudd highlighted Schorr's tenacity as the characteristic he revered most.

“He was a bulldog, I’ll tell you. Tenacious, once he got his teeth into a story, he really never, never let go. He was not a matinee idol. His words tended to tumble, there were traces of his Bronx accent still with him. He was a reporter the likes of which the Washington bureau, where I worked with him, the likes of which we never had. He was indefatigable. He once told me, ‘They may not like me, but they’ll like the stories I’ll tell.’ ”

In 1971, Schorr discovered his name on President Nixon’s “enemies list” as he read it on the air. Mudd said his friend never endeared himself to people in power because he believed journalist were responsible for making public officials accountable for their deeds.