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Brown, Boxer, fellow Democrats rally in downtown LA

California Attorney General and democratic gubernatorial candidate Jerry Brown (R) and U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) raise their arms during a campaign rally at the Los Angeles public library on November 1, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. With one day to go until election day, Jerry Brown is wrapping up his three day campaign trip throughout California in hopes of defeating his republican challenger and former eBay CEO Meg Whitman.
California Attorney General and democratic gubernatorial candidate Jerry Brown (R) and U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) raise their arms during a campaign rally at the Los Angeles public library on November 1, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. With one day to go until election day, Jerry Brown is wrapping up his three day campaign trip throughout California in hopes of defeating his republican challenger and former eBay CEO Meg Whitman.
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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A day before voters go to the polls, the entire Democratic ticket of candidates for statewide office gathers outside the central library in downtown Los Angeles.

There were lots of cheers and clapping as Jerry Brown emerged from the front door of the library and took the stage.

"O.K., thank you very much."

Brown quickly got the point.

“What a great day for the last day of the campaign, a great time to re-energize, recommit, make sure every body goes out to vote tomorrow for the entire Democratic ticket."

That ticket joined him on stage. Loyal Democrats waved political placards behind them as downtown workers and curious library-goers checked out the ruckus.

Brown, 72, seeks to return to the governor’s office he held three decades ago. He faces former eBay chief Meg Whitman. He's leading Whitman in most polls, even though she's spent more than $140 million dollars of her money on the campaign.

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer also took the stage. She is up against a strong challenge from former Hewlett Packard chief Carly Fiorina.

“This campaign of mine has been a really, really tough fight," Boxer said.

Democrats outnumber Republicans in California, and members of that party are faring better in the polls than Democrats nationwide.

But some pundits predict that many Democrats won’t show up to vote.

“There is an assumption that our folks are feeling so beaten down and dispirited that they don’t know the power of their voice," Kamala Harris said. Harris is the Democratic nominee for attorney general.

She urged Democrats to counter any predictions that Republicans are more enthusiastic about this election. That’s especially important in her tight contest with Republican nominee and L.A. District Attorney Steve Cooley.