Business & Economy

LA judge halts Boyle Heights marijuana farmers market

Anthony Guillen, left, shows a sample of a marijuana bud to a patient at the California Heritage Market, the first-ever cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles. The event drew more than a thousand people to an industrial area of Boyle Heights where all types and forms of marijuana were for sale to medical marijuana patients. A judge ruled Tuesday to block the market's operation after the city attorney asked for an injunction.
Anthony Guillen, left, shows a sample of a marijuana bud to a patient at the California Heritage Market, the first-ever cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles. The event drew more than a thousand people to an industrial area of Boyle Heights where all types and forms of marijuana were for sale to medical marijuana patients. A judge ruled Tuesday to block the market's operation after the city attorney asked for an injunction.
Benjamin Brayfield/KPCC

A Los Angeles judge has issued a temporary restraining order blocking the operation of an outdoor medical marijuana farmers market.

City News Service reports the judge ruled Tuesday after attorneys for the city of Los Angeles asked for the injunction.

The California Heritage Market, operated by the West Coast Collective, opened for business in Boyle Heights over the Fourth of July weekend, attracting big crowds hoping to sample the offerings.

On Monday, City Attorney Mike Feuer told KPCC the market violated Proposition D, the voter-approved ordinance that restricts the number of pot dispensaries allowed to operate in the city:

[Feuer] said the event also constitutes a nuisance to the residents of the neighborhood.

"It also fails, we allege, to comply with basic city land use laws," Feuer said. "And they couldn't get a permit if they tried. So for many reasons — from the violation of Prop D to the impact on the community to the failure to comply with city land use law — we allege that this isn't a use that should be allowed to continue and we're going to seek a court order to put a halt to it."

David Welch, an attorney for West Coast Collective, says collective members who grow marijuana are allowed to sell their products to other members.