Environment & Science

Heat wave continues into weekend as more records fall

Baylee Dominguez of Los Angeles swims laps at the Glassell Park Pool in this file photo taken Friday, Sept. 12 during a the start of an earlier heat wave that hit Southern California.
Baylee Dominguez of Los Angeles swims laps at the Glassell Park Pool in this file photo taken Friday, Sept. 12 during a the start of an earlier heat wave that hit Southern California.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC

A red flag warning was extended Friday for the mountains, valleys and coasts as Southern California's fall heat wave broke new records and kept the fire danger high.

The fire weather conditions were expected to continue at least until Friday with triple-digit heat expected into the weekend, according to the National Weather Service.

Heat records fell on Thursday, reports NBC4:

New highs for the date were set Thursday in Long Beach, Oxnard, Santa Barbara and Santa Maria. Temperatures hit the mid- to high 90s across Southern California.

Taking a break during roller derby practice in Sylmar, Sandra Addante had three words for the weather: "I hate it."

"I feel like from September on till probably May, it shouldn't be like this," said Addante, who skates under the name Sassy Stone. "I don't even know why they sell jackets because it's hot here all the time."

But Tony Shine, a recent transplant from Buffalo, New York, doesn't mind the heat. "Some people complain about being out here in the Valley," said Shine, standing outside a San Fernando coffee shop. "This doesn't even bother me. I know what cold weather is. You can't complain when you know what cold weather is."

The lingering summer conditions have even prompted Raging Waters to extend its season and stay open through the weekend. 

According to KCAL9, it's the first time the San Dimas water park has ever been open in October.

The red flag warning extends to Friday evening with a chance it could extend into the weekend, and humidity will be extremely low — as low as 4 percent, according to the weather service.

The dry Santa Ana winds are expected to blow 10 mph to 20 mph with gusts up 35 mph.

Locals trying to beat the heat were also warned of another potential hazard: the weather service issued a beach hazards statement warning of dangerous swimming conditions through the weekend.

Surf of 3 feet to 6 feet and strong rip currents are expected across the Los Angeles and Ventura counties, along with an additional risk of sneaker waves, which can spill over dry rocks and jetties.

The weather service reminds everyone that if you're caught in a rip current, you should swim parallel to the shore rather than trying to fight it.