Despite resupply delays, International Space Station is fine on supplies

This picture of the International Space Station was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis as the orbiting complex and the shuttle performed their relative separation in the early hours of July 19, 2011. The western Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are visible below.
This picture of the International Space Station was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis as the orbiting complex and the shuttle performed their relative separation in the early hours of July 19, 2011. The western Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are visible below.
NASA

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Hawthorne-based Space X is delaying a rocket launch that was planned for Friday.

The company was set to send supplies to the International Space Station, but now it likely won’t make the delivery until Jan. 6 at the earliest.

This comes after a previous unmanned resupply mission from a different company exploded during launch in October.

That rocket, built by Orbital Sciences, was carrying roughly 5,000 pounds of supplies, experiments and equipment.

Despite these setbacks, astronauts on board the station have plenty of food and water, according to Rob Navias with NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

"There is an abundant amount of food, fuel and logistical supplies available fro the crew members on board," he told KPCC.

In fact, Navias explained even if no other resupply missions reached the ISS, there is enough in storage there to keep operations running until summer of 2015.

In addition, Russia sent a resupply mission to the station in October and Japan also makes a yearly delivery.

Navias said the goal is to make sure that there are back up ways to keep the station stocked with food, water, tools and experiments.

The latest delay was a set-back for space geeks though.

Once the supply capsule detached from the rocket, SpaceX planned to demonstrate technology that would bring the rocket back to earth undamaged and ready to use again.