Environment & Science

Visualizing sea level rise through Southern California's King Tides

File photo: During three winter months every year, the backbeat of California's coast changes. King Tides, the highest highs and lowest lows, offer a glimpse of sea level rise.
File photo: During three winter months every year, the backbeat of California's coast changes. King Tides, the highest highs and lowest lows, offer a glimpse of sea level rise.
Flickr via John Luton
File photo: During three winter months every year, the backbeat of California's coast changes. King Tides, the highest highs and lowest lows, offer a glimpse of sea level rise.
Doug Wille works out at the beach, so he snapped shots of Rustic Creek, full of trash, during January's King Tide. "The more water that’s in the ocean, the bigger the swells and the surf that’s going to be, and anything close to the surf is going to get washed out."
Molly Peterson/KPCC
File photo: During three winter months every year, the backbeat of California's coast changes. King Tides, the highest highs and lowest lows, offer a glimpse of sea level rise.
17-year-old Jeremy Bellman went down to see King Tides at Cabrillo Beach in December. Is Southern California ready for sea level rise? "I believe we are not."
Molly Peterson/KPCC
File photo: During three winter months every year, the backbeat of California's coast changes. King Tides, the highest highs and lowest lows, offer a glimpse of sea level rise.
Port of Los Angeles High School science teacher Tim Dikdan gave students extra credit for observing King Tides, which can offer a glimpse of sea level rise.
Molly Peterson/KPCC


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