Politics

Recount in OC ends confirming Andrew Do as supervisor

Republican attorney Andrew Do, a Vietnamese American, beat longtime Democratic politician Lou Correa, a Latino, by 43 votes in a special election for the first district seat on the Orange County Board of Supervisors.
Republican attorney Andrew Do, a Vietnamese American, beat longtime Democratic politician Lou Correa, a Latino, by 43 votes in a special election for the first district seat on the Orange County Board of Supervisors.
Erika Aguilar/KPCC

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A recount in the race for the First District Board of Supervisors seat in Orange County ended Friday night with no change in the vote total, according to the county registrar’s office.

This confirms Republican attorney Andrew Do’s election as county supervisor.

Do beat former state Sen. Lou Correa by 43 votes in last month’s special election to fill the vacant seat resigned by former supervisor Janet Nguyen after her election to the state Senate.  Do was her chief of staff.

A total of 48,626 votes were cast in the official count. Correa requested the recount.

Nearly 6,250 vote-by-mail ballots were recounted and reviewed during the four-day recount, which started on February 9, according to the O.C. Registrar’s office.

Correa told KPCC early Saturday that his campaign will have more to say about the recount in a few days.

“We are reviewing all the information we collected from the recount this weekend,” he said. 

Do, a Vietnamese American, had little electoral experience beyond two years on the Garden Grove City Council but his former boss Nguyen campaigned for him during the short election period.

Even though Latino voters dominate the First District, with 36 percent of registered voters, according to an analysis by Political Data Inc., Vietnamese American voters are the second largest block, at 24 percent. They helped pushed Do to the top with 46 percent of the early mail-in ballots cast by Vietnamese voters.

Do was sworn in as supervisor on February 3 giving the O.C. Board of Supervisors an Asian-Americans majority for the first time.