Crime & Justice

Protests after police in Wisconsin kill 19-year-old black suspect

On Friday, March 6, 2015, a police officer shot a black teenager in an apartment building on Madison's near east side.
On Friday, March 6, 2015, a police officer shot a black teenager in an apartment building on Madison's near east side.
Erik Lorenzsonn (via YouTube)

A fatal police shooting of a 19-year-old black man in Madison, Wis., following what officials say was an altercation with an officer, has sparked outrage among some in the community, who turned out to protest the killing.

The dead man was identified by family members, but police have declined to confirm his name.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports:

"After the shooting, a crowd of demonstrators and organizers from the Young, Gifted and Black Coalition gathered at the scene and formed a line across Few Street, where police had blocked off the area around the scene of the shooting.

"Dozens of people drummed, prayed and chanted 'Black lives matter.'"

The paper says it was unclear whether the shooting victim had a weapon, but it quotes Madison Police Chief Mike Koval as saying that police were called because "a man, who was responsible for a recent battery, was jumping in and out of traffic and creating a safety hazard."

Wisconsin Public Radio quotes Koval as saying the suspect had apparently battered a pedestrian. The police chief was quoted by WPR as saying an "initial search" of the suspect found no evidence of a gun.

"Many protesters also alleged that Robinson was unarmed, though as of yet there has been no confirmation of that," WPR says.

The Journal says:

"An officer went to an apartment that the man had gone into, heard a disturbance and forced entry, and was assaulted by the man, Koval said.

"'The officer did draw his revolver and subsequently shot the subject,' he said.

"Koval said more than one shot was fired. He said the officer immediately began to administer first aid, as did other officers who arrived at the scene."

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