Arts & Entertainment

Jay Z's 'Made In America' Festival leaves LA, heads back East

Musician Juanes performs on the Marilyn Stage during day 2 of the 2014 Budweiser Made in America Festival at Los Angeles Grand Park on August 31, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
Musician Juanes performs on the Marilyn Stage during day 2 of the 2014 Budweiser Made in America Festival at Los Angeles Grand Park on August 31, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Anheuser-Busch

The Philadelphia-born "Made In America" music festival won't be returning to Los Angeles this year. Instead, the music festival will be heading back east with dates in Philly and an additional free concert in New York City. 

The music fest was founded by famed rapper Jay Z, sponsored by Budweiser and produced by Live Nation.

In 2014, the rapper announced, alongside Mayor Garcetti, that he would bring the massive concert to L.A.'s Grand Park. The LA Times reports that the move is official and confirmed by Live Nation:

... Instead of staging a simultaneous L.A. edition, Made in America will host a free concert on New York’s Liberty Island, Billboard reported Thursday morning. (Billboard has since taken the  story down from its website. The Times confirmed with representatives from Live Nation that the festival is not returning to Los Angeles.)

To some this may not be a surprise. According to the Times, despite big acts like Kanye West and John Mayer, the festival didn't do so well and produced major concerns: 

Garcetti also faced strong criticism from both City Council officials and area residents for getting the festival approved so quickly without much public debate.

There was concern about noise and crowd control. Residents griped, loudly, about security in and around their apartment buildings and how the many street closures would impact roads already overburdened by traffic and a construction boom.

The economic impact of the event was also a point of contention. The event netted an estimated $31,000 for city coffers, according to an economic analysis of the event released in January, and was estimated to have generated nearly $15 million in economic activity in the city.

“This is not at all a stepping back — this is a reevaluation of the model of going from one location to two to three,” Budweiser VP of marketing Brian Perkins told Billboard, according to the Times.

“We’re a very ambitious brand, and we have a very ambitious partner in Jay Z, who also dreams big. And we always want to do big, bold things with music under the moniker of Budweiser Made In America.”