Environment & Science

Tons of contaminated soil to be removed in Huntington Park, land to become BMW dealership

The Environmental Protection Agency says crews will begin excavating Thursday at the location in Huntington Park where steel was made from 1928 until 2002.
The Environmental Protection Agency says crews will begin excavating Thursday at the location in Huntington Park where steel was made from 1928 until 2002.
California Department of Toxic Substances Control

Federal and state officials plan to remove 5,600 tons of contaminated soil from the site of a former steel plant in the city of Huntington Park.

The Environmental Protection Agency says crews will begin excavating Thursday at the location about 6 miles south of downtown Los Angeles.

Steel was made there from 1928 until 2002, when Southland Steel ceased operations at the site. Before that it was the site of a fertilizer manufacturing facility.

Officials say the ground is filled with contaminants including arsenic, cadmium and lead. The cleanup will be paid for in part by an EPA grant.

The cleanup will be at 5959 to 6169 Alameda Street, according to the EPA.

Eventually the location will be the site of a new BMW electric vehicle dealership.