Business & Economy

What would a Los Angeles 2024 Olympics look like?

A renovated Memorial Coliseum would once again host track and field and the opening and closing ceremonies.
A renovated Memorial Coliseum would once again host track and field and the opening and closing ceremonies.
Parkinson

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Fencing at the Microsoft Theater? Taekwondo at Disney Concert Hall? These could be some of the venues for a 2024 Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

L.A.'s Olympic push is being run out of Mayor Eric Garcetti’s office. Before meeting with the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), Garcetti staffers are scrambling to retool plans they shelved when the committee picked Boston over L.A. in January.

Time is of the essence, since the USOC has until September to formally submit a bid to the International Olympic Committee.

Garcetti wants to keep his plans close to the vest to avoid tipping his hand to the USOC – and keep speculators from buying up land around possible Olympic sites. However, it's possible to get a good idea of where events would be based on Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games (SCCOG) drawings that were published on the the international sporting news website Inside the Games in 2014.

Earlier this year, the Los Angeles Times reported that 80 percent of Olympic events would take place at venues that did not exist during the 1984 games, or have been significantly remodeled since then.

The San Fernando Valley, which went unrepresented during the 1984 Olympics, would get several sports.

The Games would be divided into several additional clusters, with a downtown grouping that features Staples Center for gymnastics and basketball, Nokia Theatre for martial arts and USC's Galen Center for yet-to-be-determined sports.

A proposed soccer stadium beside the Coliseum would be temporarily converted into a swimming venue.

An expanded Convention Center would house several sports, much like the popular ExCeL Centre at the 2012 London Olympics.

Correction: An earlier version of this story used the wrong name for the Microsoft Theater. The story has been updated accordingly.