Crime & Justice

Disneyland, Universal Studios employ metal detectors at entrances

Representatives at Disneyland said the park would also beef up Anaheim Police patrols at entrances, bring on bomb sniffing dogs and stop the sale of toy guns in the park.
Representatives at Disneyland said the park would also beef up Anaheim Police patrols at entrances, bring on bomb sniffing dogs and stop the sale of toy guns in the park.
Mario Anzuoni/Reuters /Landov

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In the wake of San Bernardino, Paris and other incidents of terrorism, theme parks like Universal Studios and Disneyland have begun using metal detectors at their entrances.

The two theme parks join a growing list of tourist attractions and event locations in Southern California that have put in extra security measures.

Disneyland and its sister park California Adventure started the new policy Thursday. The park says guests will be selected at random to walk through metal detectors. Visitors can expect more Anaheim police details, too.

"We’ve also discontinued the sale of toy guns and theme parks," said Suzi Brown, a representative for Disneyland. "We’re no longer permitting toy guns to be brought into the theme parks."

Universal Studios in Hollywood says it’ll begin using wand metal detectors this week, just as a test for now.

Representatives with Disneyland and Universal Studios wrote in statements that the new measures weren’t in response to any one specific event.

The two parks aren’t the first big attractions in the area to incorporate metal detectors—places like Staples Center and Knott’s Berry Farm have used them for years.

Responding to new mandatory safety regulations from Major League Baseball, both the Dodgers and Angels began using walk through metal detectors earlier this year.

Further south, neither the San Diego Zoo nor Legoland would say whether they use metal detectors. Representatives say they don’t disclose what security measures they use in order to keep them effective