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Where do you recycle your Christmas tree?

rees can be recycled and turned into mulch, so why not do that? The best way to dispose of your tree depends on where you live.
rees can be recycled and turned into mulch, so why not do that? The best way to dispose of your tree depends on where you live.
Photo by sea-turtle via Flickr Creative Commons

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If you were among the millions of Americans to buy a Christmas tree this year, you and your tree made it through another holiday. 

Now you have a big, dead plant to get rid of, and you don't want to see it rotting outside for ages, right? Trees can be recycled and turned into mulch, so why not do that? The best way to dispose of your tree depends on where you live.

Los Angeles residents can leave their trees on the curb on the normal collection days, just set them next to your green waste bin. If that doesn’t work, you can bring your tree to a collection site on January 9 — there are about 18 different locations all over the city. See the Department of Sanitation website for specifics.

Long Beach is hosting tree drop offs at local parks — the dates vary, though.

Starting January 4, the city of Pasadena offers curbside collection. You can drop off trees any time between December 26 and January 15 at a handful of parks around the city. 

If you don't live in one of those cities, Los Angeles County runs a nifty website with details for every city and unincorporated area inside county limits.

Orange and Riverside County receive pickup services from Waste Management, a private contractor. Both counties offer curbside pickup too in the weeks following Christmas, but there are size limits. Waste Management lays it out for both the OC and Inland Empire on their website. 

No matter where you live, the advice is pretty much all the same: remember to take the ornaments off, tinsel too, and flocked trees aren't recyclable. Check with local city sanitation departments to see what rules apply.