Environment & Science

Los Angeles braces for a rainy week ahead

In Los Angeles, women use umbrellas under a steady September 2015 rainfall. A series of storms related to El Niño is expected to dump up to six inches of rain on the Southland this week.
In Los Angeles, women use umbrellas under a steady September 2015 rainfall. A series of storms related to El Niño is expected to dump up to six inches of rain on the Southland this week.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

A series of storms is expected to dump up to six inches of rain on the Southland this week.

In Southern California, scattered showers are expected Monday across greater Los Angeles with the afternoon expected to dry up a bit before more rain moves in again, the Associated Press reported. Then it's likely to be wet for the rest of the week. 

L.A. County could get between 2 and 3 inches of rain by Tuesday night, with parts of the Southland expected to get up to six inches of rain by Friday, according to the National Weather Service. 

Most of the week's rain is predicted for Tuesday and Wednesday but showers could linger through Thursday evening. 

The predictions of rain come less than a week after NASA released a pair of satellite images revealing a big, powerful El Niño is coming in the early months of 2016.

"El Niño's going to turn the faucet on and we’re going to be drinking from the fire hose," Josh Willis, project scientist for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, told KPCC.

High winds and flooding could accompany the week's rains. National Weather Service Meteorologist John Dumas told KPCC that even residents living in areas that haven't been hit by wildfires should consider stocking up on sandbags.

"We're very concerned with a lot of the areas where there has been fire. When the rain comes down on that, it could start triggering the mud and the rocks and everything else to start coming down," Dumas said.

At L.A. and Ventura county beaches, waves could peak as high as 16 feet this week.

The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration says the storms will also bring snow to mountains with elevations of more than 6,000 feet.

Resorts in the Sierra and San Gabriel mountains are expecting several feet of snow. At Mammoth Resorts, where attendance has already exceeded the last season's numbers, more snow is music to spokeswoman Lauren Burke's ears.

"We're averaging about 15,000 people on the hill every day, which is really solid holiday visitation. Some days we've seen even a little more than that and any time it snows we've seen that number pick up," Burke told KPCC. 

We want to hear from you: Do you live in an area that's vulnerable to flooding or mudslides? How are you preparing for the wet weather ahead? Let us know on Facebook or in the comments section below.