Environment & Science

El Niño rain, high surf hitting Southern California this week

A man crosses a street during a steady rainfall on September 15, 2015 in Los Angeles, California, as a low-pressure system filled with moisture from a former tropical cyclone unleashed heavy rain. At least eight people were pulled into rain-swollen San Gabriel River Tuesday as a storm drenched Southern California, flooding freeways and knocking out power.  AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN        (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A man crosses a street during a steady rainfall on September 15, 2015 in Los Angeles, California, as a low-pressure system filled with moisture from a former tropical cyclone unleashed heavy rain. At least eight people were pulled into rain-swollen San Gabriel River Tuesday as a storm drenched Southern California, flooding freeways and knocking out power. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
File photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Southern California could see up to six inches of rain by the end of the week.

In the Southland, scattered showers are expected Monday across greater Los Angeles with the afternoon expected to dry up a bit before more rain moves in again, the Associated Press reported. Then it's likely to be wet for the rest of the week. 

L.A. County could get between 2 and 3 inches of rain by Tuesday night, with parts of the Southland expected to get up to six inches of rain by Friday, according to the National Weather Service. 

https://twitter.com/NWSLosAngeles/status/684009870631161856

The same storm that's bringing the rain is also expected to cause huge waves. The National Weather Service says high surf and potential flooding could hit a lot of the west-facing beaches, especially on Wednesday and Thursday.

https://twitter.com/NWSLosAngeles/status/684011296438652928

“We're preparing for possible flooding and also swift water rescues in the Santa Ana river,” Huntington Beach Marine Safety Lieutenant Michael Beuerluin told NBCLA. “The water quality degrades because of the runoff, so there's an increased level of bacteria in the water.”

Lifeguards are warning Huntington Beach residents to stay out of the water during the storm and for 72 hours afterwards.