Business & Economy

LA City Council unanimously approves zero tolerance policy for taxi drivers' prejudice at LAX

LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 26:  Traffic approaches LAX as people travel to Thanksgiving holiday destinations on November 26, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Travel experts are forecasting LAX to be the busiest airport in the nation during the Thanksgiving holiday travel period as more than 1.97 million passengers are expected to use the airport. This would be a 4.8 percent increase over the 1.82 million last year, which made LAX the busiest in 2013 as well.  (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 26: Traffic approaches LAX as people travel to Thanksgiving holiday destinations on November 26, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Travel experts are forecasting LAX to be the busiest airport in the nation during the Thanksgiving holiday travel period as more than 1.97 million passengers are expected to use the airport. This would be a 4.8 percent increase over the 1.82 million last year, which made LAX the busiest in 2013 as well. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images

Cab drivers who discriminate at the airport could soon see their permits revoked.

The LA City Council unanimously voted Tuesday to approve a zero-tolerance policy for handling any taxi drivers who deny someone a ride at LAX for prejudicial reasons. The proposal comes after former Major League Baseball player Doug Glanville claimed an LAX cabbie refused to give him a ride because he's black. 

Councilman Paul Koretz supported the move -- but said it should also apply to Uber and Lyft.

"There's no reason why they should be left out of this effort to avoid discrimination except that we typically treat them differently," said Koretz. 
 
Under the old rules, taxi drivers would need to commit at least three offenses before his or her permit could be revoked. Now all it takes is one valid discrimination complaint. The policy also does away with any type of informal warning system.