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Police corner black bear in Pasadena

File photo: An adult black bear walks through a residential neighborhood on September 9, 2012 in Montrose, California.
File photo: An adult black bear walks through a residential neighborhood on September 9, 2012 in Montrose, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

Right now, she's probably snoring in a remote, shady spot in the Angeles National Forest. But an adult female black bear spent most of Friday afternoon and Saturday morning playing possum in a Pasadena neighborhood.

The adult female black bear was spotted late Friday afternoon, Lt. Marty Wall of the Department of Fish and Wildlife tells KPCC, but before officials could find her it got dark.

On Saturday morning at approximately 9 a.m., the Pasadena Police Department began receiving calls about a bear walking around the 1300 block of E. Washington, according to Lt. John Mercado.

A black bear was treed and tranquilized Saturday morning on North Michigan Ave. after strolling through nearby neighborhoods in Pasadena.
A black bear was treed and tranquilized Saturday morning on North Michigan Ave. after strolling through nearby neighborhoods in Pasadena.

Officers finally cornered the bear around noon, in a residential neighborhood near the 1000 block of N. Michigan Ave. 

When Fish and Wildlife officials arrived, the bear went up a tree and wardens tranquilized her. After falling asleep, she received a free ride to the Angeles National Forest.

"When they wake up they're a little groggy, a little cranky," Wall says. "We don't want a bunch of people gawking around and getting in the way. So we'll pick a remote, locked road and let it wake up in the shade and go about its business."

When bears are close to the edge of the forest or open space, Fish and Wildlife officials will usually chase them back toward the wilderness. But this one had strayed too far into residential territory.

Earlier this week, a bear (no word on whether it's the same animal) was spotted roaming another section of Pasadena. And last week, a bear was spotted near a Rancho Cucamonga school.

Southern Californians who live near wilderness should get ready for more ursine visitors, Wall says: "This is this is the busiest time of year for bears to wander in residential areas. They're looking for food or water or both — and people tend to provide everything bears need."

We have some tips on what to do if you encounter a bear in your neighborhood here