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LAPD chief and The Game call on LA to #StopTheViolence

Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, left, listens as rapper The Game speaks at a news conference following a meeting he and fellow rapper Snoop Dogg had with Beck and Mayor Eric Garcetti at police headquarters in Los Angeles Friday, July 8, 2016. The rappers led a peaceful march where they urged improved relations between police and minority communities in the wake of shootings in Dallas that left five police officers dead.
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, left, listens as rapper The Game speaks at a news conference following a meeting he and fellow rapper Snoop Dogg had with Beck and Mayor Eric Garcetti at police headquarters in Los Angeles Friday, July 8, 2016. The rappers led a peaceful march where they urged improved relations between police and minority communities in the wake of shootings in Dallas that left five police officers dead.
Nick Ut/AP

Chief Beck and The Game want the violence in L.A. to stop.

In a new video launching a Los Angeles police campaign dubbed #StopTheViolence, L.A.'s top cop and the Compton rapper ask Angelenos to unite behind a message of change.

In L.A. "80 percent of the victims and 80 percent of the shooters were young men of color" in 2015, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck says in the video.

The Game adds: "We have to be more positive, we have to stop killing one another."

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The video is the first in a series of public service announcements asking the community to be the change, according to a statement from the Los Angeles Police Department.

Its release comes after The Game and Snoop Dogg appeared at a peaceful protest the morning after five Dallas police officers were shot and killed by snipers in the midst of national unrest following the police-involved shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile

While Snoop Dogg and The Game appeared at a press conference with Beck and Mayor Eric Garcetti in solidarity for peace between police and community, Black Lives Matter protesters have not embraced the alliance formed between the rappers and city leadership.

"Of course it was a wonderful boon for the mayor and police chief's P.R. campaign to be able to pull in people who have some legitimacy in the black community and pretend as if there is a relationship," said Black Lives Matter organizer Melina Abdullah at the time. But, she added, the movement would continue to focus more on what she called "state-sanctioned violence" at the hands of police.