Politics

LA Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks at the Democratic convention

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks during the final day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks during the final day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks during the final day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti during the final day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks during the final day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Congresswoman Maxine Waters surrounded by irate parents and their toddlers at the Los Angeles County Office of Education's Office in Downey
Deepa Fernandes
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks during the final day of the 2016 Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Democratic Presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton(L) meets with Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) elected officials, including Representative Judy Chu, Democrat-Pasadena, on January 7, 2016 in San Gabriel, California, to discuss what's at stake for the AAPI community. AFP PHOTO/FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP / FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images


Tired faces greeted Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti in Philadelphia on Thursday morning. But on Day 4 of the Democratic National Convention, his speech at the California delegation's breakfast meeting woke people up.

Scott Shafer, who covers California politics and government for our partner station KQED, told KPCC that Garcetti brought down the house: "He gave a rousing speech with very few notes. One of the best lines — he compared Donald Trump to P.T. Barnum and then said, 'But at least P.T. Barnum knew how to corral the elephants.'"

Garcetti's strong speech has fueled talk of a potential run for governor in 2018. Garcetti spoke to the full convention Thursday afternoon, but didn't seem to make as much of an impact on the larger convention crowd beyond the Californians. You can watch the full speech below:

Video

"Los Angeles is a city with such a huge, thriving Latino population, that we expect Donald Trump to build a wall around us," Garcetti said early in his remarks. Later he added, "America doesn't need a political pyromaniac for president."

Garcetti used his time on stage to take shots at Trump and to talk up his own resume, but focused on L.A.'s accomplishments and argued that those issues are exactly what Hillary Clinton wants to bring to the rest of the country.

The issues that Garcetti brought up: infrastructure, poverty/the minimum wage, gun control and free higher education. This included talking about L.A. leading the way on instituting a $15-per-hour minimum wage.

Garcetti's not the only Southern California politician making an impact at the DNC. Representative Maxine Waters took the stage in the convention hall on Wednesday night. She gave credit to Bernie Sanders for "contributing to our historic progressive platform" before throwing her support behind Hillary Clinton.

"We must leave this convention energized, united and committed to winning in November. America, we have a winner in waiting," Waters said.

She also said she was "elated to support a candidate who understands diplomacy, global security and the importance of climate protection."

maxine waters speech vid

Waters represents the 43rd Congressional District, which includes South L.A., Westchester and Torrance.

San Gabriel Valley Congresswoman Judy Chu is also in Philadelphia. and she's hoping Clinton will paint a more hopeful picture of America than her opponent, Donald Trump.

Chu, who represents a diverse district that's roughly divided among Asians, whites and Latinos, tells KPCC that her constituents want to hear Clinton talk about their concerns: "They want their issues to be addressed — such as comprehensive immigration reform, reducing the gun violence, having more jobs and having access to higher education."

Clinton will address the convention Thursday night to accept the Democratic Party's nomination.

This story has been updated.