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Get your piece of the 6th Street bridge

Next to the sixth street viaduct, hundreds of rocks await the attendees of Rock Day LA, an event sponsored by Councilmember José Huizar and the city's Bureau of Engineering. Starting 10 A.M. on Saturday, the first 1,000 people can take home their own piece.
Next to the sixth street viaduct, hundreds of rocks await the attendees of Rock Day LA, an event sponsored by Councilmember José Huizar and the city's Bureau of Engineering. Starting 10 A.M. on Saturday, the first 1,000 people can take home their own piece.

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This weekend, community members are invited to claim their small piece of the 6th Street Bridge at "Rock Day L.A."

The iconic bridge near Boyle Heights is being replaced due to structural issues. Demolition crews have been dismantling it since February. The decision to replace the bridge drew an outcry from locals who grew up near the bridge, and were fond of its style.

Starting Saturday at 10 a.m., city officials will hand out 1,000 chunks of concrete from the demolished bridge, on a first-come-first-served basis. 

Mago Amador, a lifelong resident of L.A. says she plans to be one of the first in line.

"Because it's just historic, you know" she said. "We have the 4th Street bridge, the 1st Street, you know, but the 6th Street bridge, because of the arches and the length, it's more symbolic for us."

Amador grew up in the old housing project Pico Aliso during the 80s. Back then, she and her friends would climb down the stairs adjacent to the bridge and race their bikes next to the L.A. River. Some days, they would get lucky and catch a glimpse of film crews shooting car commercials. 

"It was our playground back then," she said. 

Now she wants to keep a piece of the bridge in her office. That way, when someone asks her about it, she can share her favorite memories. She said her chunk of the 6th Street bridge will remind her to talk about her childhood with her own daughter and granddaughter. 

The decision to give out the pieces of the viaduct came about when Mago and other community members contacted Councilman José Huizar through Facebook and at public events, urging him to share pieces of the beloved bridge with the community. Along with their rocks, attendees of Saturday's event will also get to take home a certificate of authenticity.