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Explaining LA measure JJJ and its vision for jobs and housing

Construction next to the Staples Center sports arena continues, spurring a flurry of construction of high-rise loft buildings nearby in Los Angeles, California.
Construction next to the Staples Center sports arena continues, spurring a flurry of construction of high-rise loft buildings nearby in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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Housing comes up on the ballot today for Los Angeles residents in the form of Measure JJJ, and it addresses the pace of development in Southern California and what's being built.

Here's what you need to know.

What it does

There are three key pieces to this initiative:

Who's behind it

The Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, is the main backer of this law.

Other backers include the Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance, SEIU and the L.A. League of Conservation Voters.

They say it will create good jobs for local Angelenos, as well as quality housing for low-income families in neighborhoods throughout the city.

Who's against it

Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce and the Building Industry Association of Southern California are among those against it.

They say these regulations will slow down the pace of development in Los Angeles, in a city that already has a housing shortage.

Where the vote stands

Something else you should know

Mayor Eric Garcetti has said he's leaning in favor JJJ, while members of the city council are mum on the issue.

Even if Measure JJJ passes, it faces another threat in 2017: The Neighborhood Integrity Initiative. That measure, which will appear on the March 2017 ballot, proposes a two year moratorium on large, dense construction projects in Los Angeles, or until the city revamps its planning and zoning codes.

If that March initiative passes, it would put a stop to so-called "mega-developments" which Measure JJJ attempts to regulate.