Politics

Anti-Trump protests erupt in Los Angeles, Oakland, Chicago, New York

Protesters in Los Angeles hold up a giant caricature of President Elect Donald Trump in Downtown Los Angeles. Moments later, they set it ablaze.
Protesters in Los Angeles hold up a giant caricature of President Elect Donald Trump in Downtown Los Angeles. Moments later, they set it ablaze.
Annie Gilbertson / KPCC
Protesters in Los Angeles hold up a giant caricature of President Elect Donald Trump in Downtown Los Angeles. Moments later, they set it ablaze.
More than a thousand people marched in downtown Los Angeles Wednesday night to protest the election of Donald Trump as president.
Annie Gilbertson / KPCC
Protesters in Los Angeles hold up a giant caricature of President Elect Donald Trump in Downtown Los Angeles. Moments later, they set it ablaze.
A woman argues with NYPD officers as she takes part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City tonight.
Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images


More than a thousand protesters marched in downtown Los Angeles for hours Wednesday afternoon and into the night, shouting "immigrants welcome here" and burning a giant caricature of president-elect Donald Trump's head on the steps of City Hall.

“My marriage might not be legit anymore, because of him. My health care might not be accessible anymore because of him,” said protester Jayden Bedard, who came from Boyle Heights. He said he's worried about the effect the Trump presidency could have on the Supreme Court and Congress.

Video: Protesters march in downtown LA

L.A.'s march was the latest of several rallies that erupted in various cities across the country --  including Chicago, Oakland, Seattle, San Francisco and New York -- shortly after Trump claimed victory in the early hours of Wednesday. They have continued for a second night.

Only a few hundred people had gathered at L.A.'s city hall in the afternoon, but by 9 pm, the crowd had grown to thousands, blocking off several blocks as they marched through the historic core of the city, first along Spring Street then back through Main Street. Demonstrators shouted "not my president", which has become a social media hashtag.

Cesar Ortiz, 19, got to the demonstration at 4 pm hoping that as the numbers of protestors grew so too would their chances of overthrowing the president elect.

“He attacks the minorities, he insults the minorities,” Ortiz said. “Once we stand up, we show them we are the majority.”

Some protests in other cities were centered around Trump-owned properties -- including a march from New York City's Union Square to the building where Trump lives. The crowd stopped traffic in Times Square, where protesters held up signs that said "No More Racism."

Trump-owned properties also were targeted in Washington and Chicago. Police set up barricades to keep crowds away.

In Seattle, crowds gathered downtown, carrying signs that said "Fight Racism" and "Not My President." One of the speakers called on protesters to "stand together and fight like hell."

The protests largely have been peaceful. The police have allowed people to march through the streets during rush hour, in some cities shutting down traffic until people had passed. In Portland police detained at least one man after protesters said he assaulted someone, according to KGW.com.

In his post-election victory speech, Trump said that he would be the president for all Americans, and that it was "time to come together as one united people."

"I pledge to every citizen of our land that I will be president for all Americans. And this is so important to me. For those who have chosen not to support me in the past, of which there were a few people, I'm reaching out to you for your guidance and your help so we can work together and unify our great country."

But many are not convinced. Trump's threats to deport illegal immigrants and ban all Muslims from entering the country has many worried they will become targets. Many NPR readers and listeners fear that race relations will deteriorate despite Trump's words.

At a protest in Miami, Cindy Wiesner, who helps undocumented workers, told NPR's Greg Allen that many of them were scared.

"We have been getting calls from our members from last night to this morning, not knowing if they should go out the door, if they should go to work — what they are going to do," she said.

Other cities where protesters have marched include Philadelphia, New Orleans and Richmond, Va.