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1,000 protestors turn out for Friday night anti-Trump rally

Demonstrators hold up placards a day after Donald Trump's victory, during a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall.
Demonstrators hold up placards a day after Donald Trump's victory, during a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall.
RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images
Demonstrators hold up placards a day after Donald Trump's victory, during a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall.
A demonstrator poses as people gather to protest a day after president-elect Donald Trump's victory, at a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall.
RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images
Demonstrators hold up placards a day after Donald Trump's victory, during a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall.
Native Americans protest the election of Republican Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Los Angeles, California, United States.
David McNew/Getty Images
Demonstrators hold up placards a day after Donald Trump's victory, during a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall.
A demonstrator holds up a placard to protest Donald Trump's victory, during a rally outside Los Angeles City Hall on November 9, 2016.
RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images


About 1,000 protesters, by LAPD estimates, hit the streets of downtown L.A. Friday night to show their displeasure with president elect Donald Trump. The crowd, many with signs reading "Not My President," ended up near City Hall.

Police began breaking up the protest around 2 a.m. Saturday.

The LAPD says almost 200 people were arrested, 187 adults and eight juveniles. Charges against the adults include failure to disperse while juveniles were mostly arrested for being out past the 10 p.m. curfew. One police car was also damaged. 

After several nights of anti-Trump demonstrations, more are planned for this weekend.

Joe Delaplaine is helping plan another march against the president in MacArthur Park on Saturday morning. He spoke to KPCC's AirTalk about the vandalism that sometimes occurs at these protests.

"It happens in Oakland, it happens in other cities,"  Delaplaine said. "People tag stuff and people break stuff and people express themselves in lots of different ways. But I mean... don't they do that at Lakers games? I don't necessarily encourage that either."

Delaplaine says he doesn't anticipate any violence at the Saturday protest, which he described as a "family event."