Health

Maybe you shouldn't deep fry that turkey...

Alameda County firefighter Bob Perez prepares to lower a 13 pound turkey into a pot of boiling oil during a safety demonstration.
Alameda County firefighter Bob Perez prepares to lower a 13 pound turkey into a pot of boiling oil during a safety demonstration.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Every year, fire departments around the country get calls from ambitious home cooks who've injured themselves while preparing their Thanksgiving feasts.

Of all the different ways to hurt yourself in a kitchen, deep-frying a turkey is, sadly, one of the most common around this time of year.

turkey fail

If you're going to fry your bird — a method that makes its skin deliciously crisp and requires comparatively little cooking time — fire officials have a few tips.

"Because what happens when the turkey hits the water, oil is heated to usually around 425 degrees fahrenheit. What it does is that if there's any moisture in a frozen turkey, it flash boils the moisture in it, and it can actually result in an explosion," Orange County Fire Authority Captain Larry Kurtz tells KPCC.

Thaw a frozen turkey first if you plan to fry it and make sure you have a safe method of removing the bird from the fryer when it's done.

The Food Network's resident kitchen whiz, Alton Brown, has several additional techniques that will hopefully help you host a fail-safe turkey fry.

Don't forget to keep a fire extinguisher nearby and call 911 if things get out of hand.