Local

California storms leave behind icy temperatures, slick roads

Raindrops bead upon a windshield as a pedestrian walks through rain in downtown Los Angeles, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. The second in a trio of storms has arrived in California. Rain, heavy at times, is overspreading the state early Friday and a flash flood warning has been issued for southeastern Sonoma County. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Raindrops bead upon a windshield as a pedestrian walks through rain in downtown Los Angeles, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. The second in a trio of storms has arrived in California. Rain, heavy at times, is overspreading the state early Friday and a flash flood warning has been issued for southeastern Sonoma County. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Damian Dovarganes/AP

A series of powerful winter storms left behind frigid temperatures, pockets of hail and icy mountain roads in Southern California.

Motorists are urged to use caution Tuesday along the Tejon Pass, where interstate lanes are slick from a continued dusting of snow.

The Auto Club of Southern California received over 71,000 calls for service and information over the rainy weekend, and are urging drivers to adopt a few practices to avoid getting stuck on roads during any upcoming storms. 

That number is a 12 percent increase from prior weekends. The auto club's Jeffrey Spring told KPCC that's a significant surge. The majority of calls were for battery and tow services. 

“In rainy weather, if your battery is not really strong, it’s not going to work very well. If your connections aren’t really tight, the moisture is going to cause the batteries to not work very well,” he said.  

As the region dries out, Spring said now is the time to catch up on car maintenance for any problematic vehicles. Things like checking tire air pressure, windshield wipers and breaks can improve their performance next time it rains.  

Maintaining proper air pressure in your tires is crucial in providing as much cushion as possible between your tire and any potholes the rain might have created.

“If your tires are under inflated, then the odds of it hitting the rim, which can cause significant damage, is higher,” Spring said.

He also recommends driving on the center lanes to avoid pooled water on the outer lanes. Driving at a high speed through big pools of water increases the chance for water to seep into the engine and cause it to stall.  

“At best, you want to avoid pooled water in the road,” he added.  

Schools are closed for a second day in mountain communities east of Los Angeles because of deep snow.

Temperatures are below freezing in foothills and desert areas north of LA.

To the north officials warn of continuing avalanche danger at all elevations of the Sierra Nevada.

At least four people died during the weekend system that swamped roads and trapped motorists.

Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday declared a state of emergency for 50 counties drenched by December and January storms.

This story has been updated.