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Are LA residents satisfied with their lives? A survey claims to have the answer

William Haight plays with his five-year-old, Soleil Haight, at the Venice Beach Boardwalk Playground on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 17, 2017.
William Haight plays with his five-year-old, Soleil Haight, at the Venice Beach Boardwalk Playground on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 17, 2017.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC

L.A. residents are mostly satisfied with their quality of life, according to the results of a survey published on Tuesday. But there are some concerns. 

The second annual Los Angeles Quality of Life Index survey was produced by the Los Angeles Initiative at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. The survey asked personal questions about how L.A. residents rated their own quality of life in nine different categories including jobs, economy, education, race relations and acceptance in their neighborhoods, Zev Yaroslavksy, the study's director, told KPCC. 

"I wanted to ask questions that the average person or the average politician wouldn't dare ask one of his or her constituents, " Yaroslavsky said. "What bothers them? What worries them? What keeps them up at night?"

The survey found that nearly half of the 1,600 respondents felt they would be negatively affected by a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. More than half were upset with the displacement of their neighbors by people who could afford to pay more for housing. Just nineteen percent viewed the phenomenon of gentrification as a good thing, according to the study. 

In central L.A., 68 percent of respondents had a negative view of gentrification, Yaroslavsky said. 

Satisfaction with the cost of living also dropped, with nearly half of the respondents saying that housing costs were the most important factor in the cost-of-living category, according to the study. 

The survey also found that the lengths of commutes were up this year, as were reported concerns about the conditions of streets, causing transportation scores to drop, according to the study. 

The most positive rating on the survey?

Race relations, according to Yaroslavsky. 

"It's a sea change from what we had a quarter of a century ago," he said. 

UCLA plans to deliver the survey results far and wide, Yaroslavsky said. The school will present the study to county officials, non-profit organizations involved with human services, chambers of commerce and the L.A. City Council this year.