Crime & Justice

Urinating man at Pasadena Metro station heavily armed

Los Angeles County Sheriff deputies show the media during a press conference the weapons seized after they arrested a man at the Sierra Madre Metro train station in Pasadena on June 21, 2017. The suspect was identified as 28-year-old Christopher Goodine. He was detained for urinating in public by sheriff's deputies, who discovered the armaments in a duffel bag. The weaponry included a loaded modified AR-15 rifle, a .40 calibre pistol, a machete and dozens of rounds of hollow point bullets.
Los Angeles County Sheriff deputies show the media during a press conference the weapons seized after they arrested a man at the Sierra Madre Metro train station in Pasadena on June 21, 2017. The suspect was identified as 28-year-old Christopher Goodine. He was detained for urinating in public by sheriff's deputies, who discovered the armaments in a duffel bag. The weaponry included a loaded modified AR-15 rifle, a .40 calibre pistol, a machete and dozens of rounds of hollow point bullets.
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities say a man caught urinating in public at a Los Angeles County light rail station was found to be heavily armed. Transit deputies arrested him.

The man, 28-year-old Christopher Goodine, was seen urinating near the stairwell at the Sierra Madre Villa Gold Line station in Pasadena on Wednesday morning, He was spotted by L.A. County Sheriff's Deputy Katherine Zubo and her partner, Zubo told KPCC. Goodine has shown no signs of mental instability or intoxication, according to Zubo.

Sheriff Jim McDonnell said there are no indications of terror activity and it's unclear why Goodine was armed. But he said deputies may have saved a lot of lives by arresting him.

Deputies found Goodine carrying a loaded handgun that is restricted for law enforcement use, another loaded high-powered firearm that resembles a rifle, two high-capacity loaded magazines, silencers/suppressors for both guns and a large survival knife nearly as long as a sword.

Goodine originally provided them with a fake name as they were about to issue a citation for public urination, Zubo said. They asked for identification and he told them it was at the bottom of his duffel bag, which led to them discovering his weapons.

"We initially just asked him for his name. We ran it through our computer and got no return, which means there’s no record of that name," Zubo said.

Once he was arrested, Goodine was questioned but didn’t give any indication how he got the weapons or what he was planning to do with them.

This story has been updated.