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Fireworks can freak out our furry friends on the 4th of July

A participant in Long Beach's annual Haute Dog Howl'oween parade.
A participant in Long Beach's annual Haute Dog Howl'oween parade.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

When it comes to the 4th of July, most pets aren't party animals.

Fireworks can spook dogs, cats and other creatures, who often behave differently when they're stressed or feeling anxious. That, in turn, can cause them to run.

Independence Day is one of the busiest holidays for the Southland's animal shelters, which are already gearing up for the holiday. 

French bulldog Serjio was one of many dogs in costume at LAX on October 28, 2016.
French bulldog Serjio was one of many dogs in costume at LAX on October 28, 2016.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Julie Bank, the President and CEO of the Pasadena Humane Society, says animal control officers will be working around the clock on the 4th of July.

"We kind of do a bit of all-hands-on deck on these holidays because we unfortunately know that we're going to get crowded and overwhelmed," Bank tells KPCC. "And the saddest part about that is that people don't always come and get their animals after they've lost them."

Bank urges pet owners to keep their animals indoors and in a quiet place over the 4th of July. It's also a good idea to make sure your pets have ID tags and are microchipped, just in case.

Dogs in costumes participate in Long Beach's annual Haute Dog Howl'oween parade.
Dogs in costumes participate in Long Beach's annual Haute Dog Howl'oween parade.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images