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Many rescued as strong rip currents hit Southern California

Strong rip currents made it a busy weekend for lifeguards. Dozens of swimmers had to be rescued at Southern California beaches because of high surf and rip currents.
Strong rip currents made it a busy weekend for lifeguards. Dozens of swimmers had to be rescued at Southern California beaches because of high surf and rip currents.
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Rip currents and large waves have led to hundreds of rescues in Southern California beaches, and the danger will remain for the next few days, according to authorities.

https://twitter.com/HBCityBeach/status/884472261943492608

Lifeguards rescued many oceangoers struggling to swim and surf in the high, choppy waters.

Lidia Barillas with the L.A. County Fire Department's Lifeguard Division elaborated about some of the dangers of rip currents and changing ocean conditions.

"Common rescues we have are usually in rip currents. People get stuck in a current that's pulling them out, away from shore," she told KPCC. "And people tend to have that natural tendency to want to swim back to shore, against the current. That's when people get tired ... they get anxious."
 
There were 597 rescues in L.A. County beaches over the weekend in the area that spans between Zuma and Cabrillo Beach. Orange County rescued nearly 600 swimmers.

Lifeguards warned swimmers and surfers about strong and unpredictable rip currents forming and made more dangerous by the high surf.

https://twitter.com/NewportBeachLG/status/883787994674507776

Rip currents are a concern for every lifeguard along the Southern California coastline. The United States Lifesaving Association says more than 82 percent of rescues are related to rip currents.