US & World

When the boom is a bust

Fans walk into the Pontiac Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan on October 8, 2001.
Fans walk into the Pontiac Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan on October 8, 2001.
Tom Pidgeon/Getty Images

Charges went off. Smoke went up.

But the Pontiac Silverdome didn't come down.

The aging structure in Michigan — the former home of the Detroit Lions, and at one time the largest NFL stadium — was slated for demolition on Sunday, but the explosion was a failure.

Executives with Adamo Group, the company in charge of the demolition, say a wiring problem caused 10 percent of the charges to fail to go off, according to the Detroit Free Press.

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The building has been weakened, however, and could fall at any time. The newspaper spoke to Adamo Group executive vice president Rick Cuppetilli.

"Excavators will be used this week to take out the structure unless gravity causes it to fall on its own before then, Cuppetilli said," the Free Press writes. "So far there are no plans for a second explosion attempt."

Diesel Volkswagen and Audi vehicles that VW bought back from consumers sit in the parking lot of the Pontiac Silverdome on August 4, 2017 in Pontiac, Michigan.
Diesel Volkswagen and Audi vehicles that VW bought back from consumers sit in the parking lot of the Pontiac Silverdome on August 4, 2017 in Pontiac, Michigan.
JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP/Getty Images

Does Twitter have jokes?

Of course, Twitter has jokes — mostly venting frustrations with the historical performance of the Detroit Lions.

The Detroit Free Press tweeted: "The Pontiac #Silverdome has withstood years of implosions. Today was no different."

dan hasty

dan wetzel

someoneidiot

terry foster

kirbygwen

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