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Vatican accepts resignation of LA bishop following decades-old abuse allegation

A Catholic worshiper prays during a pilgrimage with Pope John Paul II's remains, in Bucharest, Romania.
A Catholic worshiper prays during a pilgrimage with Pope John Paul II's remains, in Bucharest, Romania.
Vadim Ghirda/AP

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The Vatican announced Wednesday that it has accepted the resignation of Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Monsignor Alexander Salazar. Salazar was accused of misconduct with a minor while he served as a priest at the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church in Pasadena in the 1990s.

Salazar has repeatedly denied the allegation, but stepped down nonetheless.

The charges against Salazar were first reported to the Pasadena Police Department in 2002.

Pasadena police say the department investigated an accusation of "lewd acts upon a child" that allegedly occurred at a private home, but determined the accusation to be unfounded. Still, it submitted a report to the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office, which in August 2002, declined to file charges.

The Los Angeles Archdiocese says it became aware of the allegation against Salazar in 2005. Because Salazar was then a bishop, local officials reported the incident to the Vatican, as required by Catholic Church canon law.

To read the full story, go to LAist.com.

Aaron Schrank reported this story as part of his coverage of religion, international affairs and the Southern California diaspora made possible by a grant from the Luce Foundation.