Education

Artist Will 'Modify' LAUSD Mural After Months Of Discussion

The controversial mural of Hollywood legend actress Ava Gardner, by muralist Beau Stanton, situated at the Robert F. Kennedy Community School, that will be removed after local Korean American groups objected to it saying its sun rays bear a resemblance to the rising sun of the imperial Japanese battle flag used in WWII, in Los Angeles, California on December 13, 2018. - The mural near the site of Robert Kennedy's death, is considered by the groups to be as offensive as a swastika to Jewish people or a burning cross to African Americans. The artist chose to pay tribute to Ava Gardner who used to frequent a nearby nightclub.
The controversial mural of Hollywood legend actress Ava Gardner, by muralist Beau Stanton, situated at the Robert F. Kennedy Community School, that will be removed after local Korean American groups objected to it saying its sun rays bear a resemblance to the rising sun of the imperial Japanese battle flag used in WWII, in Los Angeles, California on December 13, 2018. - The mural near the site of Robert Kennedy's death, is considered by the groups to be as offensive as a swastika to Jewish people or a burning cross to African Americans. The artist chose to pay tribute to Ava Gardner who used to frequent a nearby nightclub.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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The Los Angeles Unified School District announced Wednesday that the artist behind a controversial mural at Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools in Mid-Wilshire/Koreatown will modify the work, with input from community members and help from students.

The artist, Beau Stanton, offered to make some changes to the piece after months of meetings with school officials, community members, and students. His mural of screen legend Ava Gardner, depicted against a backdrop of radiating red-orange and blue stripes, drew criticism from neighbors who said the pattern resembled the alternating red and white rays of the battle flag of the Japanese Imperial Army. 

The revised work will use the original mural as its base. Stanton said the final imagery won’t be determined until he’s able to meet with students and community members to hear their thoughts and concerns.

For more about the mural, read our story on LAist.com.