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Models for cutting health care costs




The emergency entrance to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is seen on October 9, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
The emergency entrance to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is seen on October 9, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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The American health care system is the most expensive in the world, but far from the best. And bills pending in Congress are unlikely to cut costs or improve quality of care. In the Nov. 8 issue of New York Times Magazine, columnist David Leonhardt, looks at one model that might change things: Intermountain Healthcare, a network of hospitals and clinics in Utah and Idaho. What can be learned from Intermountain’s results-based, statistical treatment guidelines? And could these improvements be applied nationally?

Guests:

David Leonhardt, Economic Scene columnist at the New York Times

Theodore Marmor, Professor Emeritus of Public Management and Political Science at Yale University