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Chilling details about Norway attack raise questions about right-wing extremism




Bomb and terror suspect Anders Behring Breivik (red top) leaves the courthouse in a police car in Oslo on July 25, 2011, after the hearing to decide his further detention.
Bomb and terror suspect Anders Behring Breivik (red top) leaves the courthouse in a police car in Oslo on July 25, 2011, after the hearing to decide his further detention.
Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen/AFP/Getty Images

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The man behind the gruesome attacks in Norway appeared in court today. Anders Behring Breivik entered a not guilty plea, but confessed to the bombing in Oslo’s government headquarters and the youth camp massacre, which killed a total of 76 people. More chilling details about Breivik are now emerging. The man who yelled, "I'll kill you all," while gunning down youths is believed to be an anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant right-wing extremist who wanted to start a revolution. His goal: to purge Europe of Muslims and punish the “indigenous Europeans” for failing to protect the continent from "cultural suicide." More attention is now being focused on the rise of right-wing extremism in many parts of Europe, where German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and British Prime Minister David Cameron have all declared that multiculturalism has failed. What about in the United States? Are we too focused on the threat from Islamist extremists? If so, are we overlooking the risks of homegrown terrorists? What can and should be done to prevent such dangers here?

Guests:

Teri Schultz, NPR reporter based in Brussels, currently in Oslo, Norway

David McIntyre, Fellow of Homeland Security Institute; Vice-President, Academics, National Graduate School; Former Dean of Faculty at the National War College