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Repeal effort underway for gay history bill, SB 48




A gay pride and an American flag hang from a shoulder bag during a demonstration outside of the Phillip Burton Federal Building on June 13, 2011 in San Francisco, California.
A gay pride and an American flag hang from a shoulder bag during a demonstration outside of the Phillip Burton Federal Building on June 13, 2011 in San Francisco, California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Last week California became the first state in the nation to pass a law requiring that the contributions of gays and lesbians be included in school textbooks. The law, authored by state Senator Mark Leno is called The Fair, Accurate, Inclusive and Respectful Education, or FAIR Act and it adds gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgendered people to the already long list of groups that have to be included in curriculums. The law has been controversial since its inception and now a conservative action group has filed to suit to put a repeal measure on the ballot next June. The group is called STOP SB 48 and they say they’re a group parents, teachers and pro-family organizations who feel the government shouldn’t dictate what’s taught in schools. One of the sponsors of the FAIR act, Equality California, takes issue with STOP SB 48. They say their facts are way off base. Either way STOP SB 48 has a long road ahead of them. They have to gather over half a million signatures within a couple of months to get on the ballot. Is that possible in bright blue California? Those behind the repeal effort say the government shouldn’t be involved in writing curriculum, is that the case when some minority groups are being left out? And should a person’s contributions be seen through the lens of their sexuality?

Guests:

Paulo Sibaja, Proponent, STOP SB 48. He filed the paperwork to start the repeal effort

Rebekah Orr, Communications Director, Equality California. They sponsored SB 48