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Reprieve for historic Beverly Hills home, but what’s next in the debate over property rights vs. preservation?




The Kronish House in Beverly Hills was designed by famed architect Richard Neutra. Its future preservation is uncertain as conservation efforts are taken up by the Beverly Hills City Council Tuesday night.
The Kronish House in Beverly Hills was designed by famed architect Richard Neutra. Its future preservation is uncertain as conservation efforts are taken up by the Beverly Hills City Council Tuesday night.
Redfin

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The Kronish House, designed in 1954 by Richard Neutra was set to be demolished by its owners but a recent contentious city council meeting put a stop to those plans. Beverly Hills is one of the few areas in southern California that doesn’t have an historic preservation ordinance on its books. But that could change. Mayor Barry Brucker says the city needs to have some kind of law in place but the issue hasn’t come up before because most residents willingly restore historic homes in the area. In this case though an investment group bought the home out of foreclosure and it’s in pretty bad shape. Real estate experts say in could be salvaged, but the owners think they can get a lot more for the property if the lot is empty. The fact is they own it. Don’t they have the right to do what they want with it? Or does preserving the mid-century masterpieces of southern California trump property rights?

Guests:

Linda Dishman, Executive Director, Los Angeles Conservancy

Tim Sandefur, Principal Attorney, Pacific Legal Foundation, author of The Right to Earn a Living: Economic Freedom of the Law