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Sexual harassment by the numbers




Sharon Bialek (L) told the media that Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain sexually harassed her in the late 1990s when she sought his help with an employment issue while he was president of the National Restaurant Association.
Sharon Bialek (L) told the media that Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain sexually harassed her in the late 1990s when she sought his help with an employment issue while he was president of the National Restaurant Association.
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

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A new poll by ABC News/Washington Post says 24 percent of women respondents have experienced sexual harassment from co-workers or supervisors. On the flip side, 25 percent of men respondents say they worry about being falsely accused of sexual harassment, while just 10 percent of men said they've said or done things that might be construed as harassing.

The poll comes after allegations against GOP presidential contender Herman Cain that led the news for days on end. A majority of Americans polled said sexual harassment in the workplace is a problem in this country, but the numbers split along political and gender lines.

More Democrats think it's a problem than Republicans. 69 percent of women say it is an issue, compared with 59 percent of men. Interestingly, the number of women who say they've been sexually harassed fell from 32 percent in 1994.

WEIGH IN:

Is sexual harassment at work declining? Are people more conscious of it? Are women reporting it less? Have you ever experienced it? How do you handle a co-worker who crosses the line? What defines that line?

Guest:

Thema Bryant-Davis, Associate Professor of Psychology, Pepperdine University