Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Is the ACA funding plan a bailout?




US President Barack Obama speaks about the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, with Vice President Joe Biden in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on April 1, 2014.
US President Barack Obama speaks about the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, with Vice President Joe Biden in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on April 1, 2014.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

19:19
Download this story 9MB

There are three provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), known colloquially, as the “three Rs.” They are: risk adjustment, reinsurance, and risk corridors. All are intended to promote insurer competition on the basis of quality and value and promote insurance market stability, particularly in the early years of reform.

Currently, the “risk corridor” provision is being scrutinized. Apparently, there is no appropriation language to get insurance companies money that might be due them. But the US Health and the Human Services department (HHS) has a plan in place.

This plan worries some, fearing the burden could land on the taxpayers back if enacted. Others say, there are safeguards in the healthcare law already, and the plan won’t be necessary.

So, what does this mean to the consumer? Higher premiums?  Or nothing to worry about?

Guests:

Yevgeniy Feyman, fellow at the Manhattan Institute. He writes on health care policy, entitlement reform, and the Affordable Care Act.

Dylan Roby, PhD, Director of Health Economics and Evaluation Research Program within the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research