Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Looking for terrorism in your own backyard




LAS VEGAS, NV - JUNE 08:  Las Vegas  Metropolitan Police Department officers put police tape up outside a Wal-Mart on June 8, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Two officers were reported shot and killed by two assailants at a pizza restaurant near the Wal-Mart. The two suspects then reportedly went into the Wal-Mart where they killed a third person before killing themselves.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - JUNE 08: Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department officers put police tape up outside a Wal-Mart on June 8, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Two officers were reported shot and killed by two assailants at a pizza restaurant near the Wal-Mart. The two suspects then reportedly went into the Wal-Mart where they killed a third person before killing themselves. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Listen to story

11:24
Download this story 5MB

When we talk about terrorism, we often think of the kind abroad, that we’re fighting wars with far, far away. But following the murders of three people at a Jewish Center in Kansas in April, a shooting at a Georgia courthouse and the murder of two Las Vegas police officers and a Las Vegas resident earlier this month -- all involving suspects expressing extremist ideology -- the Justice Department is calling back a federal task force that’s laid dormant for more than a decade.

It’s called the Domestic Terrorism Task Force, and it was first formed in response to the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing but shortly disbanded after 9/11, when the national focus began to shift toward terrorism overseas. We’ll talk with a terrorism expert about what the group will focus on and where the most urgent domestic threats are growing.

Guest:  

 

Brian Michael Jenkins, senior adviser to the president of the RAND Corporation