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Could a class action lawsuit change the culture of Wall Street?




NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 20:  Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on June 20, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 20: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on June 20, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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In 2010 a group of former Goldman Sachs employees filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against their former employer.

Now, they want to turn it into a class action case that would include employees of the company dating back to 2002 and potentially involve thousands of women. The suit alleges that female associates and vice presidents at Goldman Sachs experienced pay disparities, gender discrimination regarding promotions, and a hostile work environment.

How might the case affect corporate culture in the investment banking industry and beyond? Could a major class action suit change the way businesses approach gender in the workplace in a wide-ranging way? 

Guests:

Alexandra Lahav, Joel Barlow Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law, expert on civil procedure and complex litigation

Michael Selmi, Samuel Tyler Research Professor of Law at George Washington University, expert in employment law, employment discrimination, contracts, and civil rights