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President Obama’s halt on immigration reform spurs backlash




SONOITA, AZ - FEBRUARY 26:  An American flag flies at the U.S.-Mexico border on February 26, 2013 near Sonoita, Arizona. The Federal government has increased the Border Patrol presence in Arizona, from some 1,300 agents in the year 2000 ro 4,400 in 2012. The apprehension of undocumented immigrants crossing into the U.S. from Mexico has declined during that time from 600,016 in 2000 to 123,000 in 2012.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
SONOITA, AZ - FEBRUARY 26: An American flag flies at the U.S.-Mexico border on February 26, 2013 near Sonoita, Arizona. The Federal government has increased the Border Patrol presence in Arizona, from some 1,300 agents in the year 2000 ro 4,400 in 2012. The apprehension of undocumented immigrants crossing into the U.S. from Mexico has declined during that time from 600,016 in 2000 to 123,000 in 2012. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore/Getty Images

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President Obama announced Saturday his decision to delay his commitment to act on immigration reform until after congressional elections in November. Having promised last June to make a decision with or without Congressional backing, this decision comes as a blow for many immigration reform advocates. His executive action is expected to prevent up to 11 million people from being deported.

Obama cited an opinion shift among Americans’ views on immigration reform following the surge of roughly 63,000 Central American minors crossing the border earlier this year. The president said in an interview with NBC’s “Meet the Press” Sunday that he needs more time to make his case to the American people, but opponents of the position say it’s purely a political ploy to help democrats win in close midterm elections. Some republican like House speaker John Boehner are also saying this move could be potentially unconstitutional. According to White House officials, taking action before the election could possibly harm long-term goals for immigration reform.

Do you agree? Is this new approach a more practical one? Or is it ultimately just politics as usual?

Guest: 

Fawn Johnson, Congressional correspondent, National Journal