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Military surplus sent to schools under examination




MRAP vehicles sit in the Redistribution Property Accountability Team (RPAT) yard at Kandahar Airfield (KAF) on March 8, 2014 near Kandahar, Afghanistan.
MRAP vehicles sit in the Redistribution Property Accountability Team (RPAT) yard at Kandahar Airfield (KAF) on March 8, 2014 near Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

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Tomorrow, members of the House Armed Services Committee will focus on a Pentagon program that sends surplus military equipment to local police forces, including school district police.

This week, LAUSD's police Chief Steve Zipperman decided the district will remove from its arsenal three 40mm less-lethal weapons (sometimes characterized as grenade launchers) it received through the "1033" program. It will retain a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle, because it "is a life-saving piece of equipment that would be utilized under extraordinary circumstances," according to an LAUSD statement.

Why did the district request the equipment initially? In what scenarios would the district police need the 40mm less-lethal weapons?

Guests:

Kelly B. Huston, Deputy Director, Crisis Communications and Media Relations, Governor's Office of Emergency Services (CalEOS) - the state office that coordinates military surplus equipment redistribution

Sergeant Joe Grubbs, President of the California School Resource Officers' Association - comprised of peace officers and educators focused on school safety; Sergeant with the Bakersfield Police Department