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As protesters in Hong Kong pull back, a look at the future of the student-led movement




Students sit on a bridge near of Hong Kong Government Complex on October 6, 2014 in Hong Kong. Pro democracy supporters continue to occupy the streets surrounding Hong Kong's Financial district. The protesters are calling for open elections and the resignation of Hong Kong's Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.
Students sit on a bridge near of Hong Kong Government Complex on October 6, 2014 in Hong Kong. Pro democracy supporters continue to occupy the streets surrounding Hong Kong's Financial district. The protesters are calling for open elections and the resignation of Hong Kong's Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.
Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

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Student demonstrators in Hong Kong began to retreat to comply with an ultimatum handed down over the weekend by the city’s Chief Executive. Hong Kong’s top leader, C.Y. Leung, called on occupiers to end their demonstrations by Monday so that government workers can return to work. Protesters did not disperse, but did open up a key road to let civil servants through.

Meanwhile, one of the groups behind the protests said it had met with Hong Kong officials to set up future talks with the city’s second in command in the hope of bringing the protests to a peaceful resolution.

As the protests drag on to its 10th day, some in the city of 7 million are showing signs of frustration. A counter-protest group calling themselves the Blue Ribbons have emerged over the weekend to support the Chinese government and Hong Kong police.

What does the future hold for the student-led movement? What should protesters do? Should they withdraw?

Guest: 

Lily Kuo,  reporter at Quartz covering the protests in Hong Kong. She is based in Hong Kong