Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

How equipped are US airports in detecting Ebola and other infectious diseases?




A nurse leaves an isolation room after checking a man on August 14, 2014 at the district hospital of Biankouma, during a simulation operation organized by the Ivory Coast Health Ministry to train medical staff to treat potential patients with Ebola.
A nurse leaves an isolation room after checking a man on August 14, 2014 at the district hospital of Biankouma, during a simulation operation organized by the Ivory Coast Health Ministry to train medical staff to treat potential patients with Ebola.
ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

22:52
Download this story 10.0MB

President Barack Obama on Monday said that the US is looking to implement additional screening measures for Ebola, two weeks after a Liberian man infected with the disease landed in Dallas. The President has not specified exactly what those measures would be, but the administration has ruled out a travel ban on people flying in from Ebola-stricken countries in West Africa.  

In addition to President Obama’s announcement, the trade group Airlines for America yesterday held talks with federal officials yesterday to discuss whether current screening methods are sufficient.

After the SARS outbreak in 2003, the Hong Kong International Airport installed infrared thermal scanners to detect passengers with fevers—a telltale symptom of most infectious diseases. With the rise of infectious diseases around the world, should airports look to adopt that technology? Would infrared thermal scanners help mitigate the spread of Ebola? What are the costs?

Guests: 

Dr. Amesh Adalja, MD; Senior Associate at the Center for Health Security at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, which works to protect people's health from the consequences of epidemics and disasters. He is also Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Critical Care Medicine at UPMC.

Dr. Melinda Moore, MD, MPH; senior natural scientist and health researcher at the RAND Corporation. Moore previously served with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 20 years and the Department of Health and Human Services' Office Global Health Affairs for five years.