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SF becomes first city in state to pass an “airbnb” law, should LA follow suit?




A protestor with the San Francisco Tenant Union hangs a sign on a the exterior of a building during a demonstration outside of an apartment building that allegedly evicted all of the tenants to convert the units to AirBnb rentals
A protestor with the San Francisco Tenant Union hangs a sign on a the exterior of a building during a demonstration outside of an apartment building that allegedly evicted all of the tenants to convert the units to AirBnb rentals
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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When it comes to tech innovation and the law, the latter is typically playing catch up. Such is the case with the short-term rental service AirBnB, which has been in existence for 6 years. On Tuesday, San Francisco became the first city in the state to pass legislation to regulate the controversial industry, which includes other sites such as VRBO, Homeaway and Flipkey.

Under San Francisco’s so-called “AirBnb law,” only permanent residents are allowed to offer short-term rents and rentals of entire homes are capped to 90 days a year. It also calls for the establishment of a short-term rental host registry and creates enforcement guidelines for the city’s Planning Department.

The law goes into effect February 2015.

Issues stemming from these short-term rentals have created tensions in neighborhoods all over Los Angeles, and the city is looking at creating legislation to control the problem. A look at the new San Francisco law and its impact on LA’s attempt to come up with a legislative solution.

Guest:

Carolyn Said, Business and technology reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle.  She covers the so-called “sharing economy” for the paper.  She tweets at @CSaid